Rorate Mass, December 15

The Rorate Mass in candlelight in honor of our Lady is scheduled for Saturday, December 15 at 9:00 AM. A commentary that describes this beautiful tradition reads:

“The season of Advent falls each year in the dark month of December and it is a month when we see the general theme of the liturgical season being echoed in nature. Darkness has crept over the world, and is increasing each day. Yet, there is hope for soon the days will begin to lengthen and the sun will conquer the night. The earth reveals that there is a light in this dark place and that Light reigns victorious. The Church makes this truth more visible with an ancient tradition called the Rorate Mass.

This votive Mass during Advent in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary receives its name from the first words of the opening chant in Latin, Rorate caeli, meaning ‘Shower, O heavens.’

All are warmly invited to attend. The monthly recollection will follow twenty minutes after the conclusion of the solemn High Mass. Spread the word!

Feast of the Immaculate Conception, December 8

Feast of the Immaculate Conception is on Saturday, December 8, and is a holyday of obligation. As it is a Saturday, the holyday Mass schedule will be modified: please note that two Masses will be offered in the morning at 7:00 AM (low) and 9:00 AM (solemn High).

First Saturday, December 1

First Saturday is this week on December 1; exposition and Benediction will precede the morning Mass beginning at 7:45 AM. The First Saturdays are kept in reparation for the blasphemies and offenses against our Lady’s Immaculate Conception, her perpetual virginity, her divine and spiritual Maternity, her sacred images, and neglect of parents to foster devotion to her in their children. All are most encouraged to attend Mass and devotions.

Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary

-taken from: https://www.romancatholicman.com/our-lady-of-sorrows/#

September is traditionally dedicated to the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Devotion to the Seven Sorrows of Our Lady has its roots in Sacred Scripture and in Christian piety, which always associates the Blessed Mother with her suffering Son. This feast was introduced by the Servites in order to intensify devotion to Our Lady’s Sorrows. In 1817 Pope Pius VII — suffering grievously in exile but finally liberated by Mary’s intercession — extended the feast to the universal Church.

This feast dates back to the 12th century. It was especially promoted by the Cistercians and the Servites, so much so that in the 14th and 15th centuries it was widely celebrated throughout the Catholic Church. In 1482 the feast was added to the Missal under the title of “Our Lady of Compassion.” Pope Benedict XIII added it to the Roman Calendar in 1727 on the Friday before Palm Sunday. In 1913, Pope Pius X fixed the date on September 15. The title “Our Lady of Sorrows” focuses on Mary’s intense suffering during the passion and death of Christ. “The Seven Dolors,” the title by which it was celebrated in the 17th century, referred to the seven swords that pierced the Heart of Mary. The feast is like an octave for the birthday of Our Lady on September 8th.

This feast is dedicated to the spiritual martyrdom of Mary, Mother of God, and her compassion with the sufferings of her Divine Son, Jesus. In her suffering as co-redeemer, she reminds us of the tremendous evil of sin and shows us the way of true repentance. May the numerous tears of the Mother of God be conducive to our salvation; with which tears Thou, O God, art able to wash away the sins of the whole world.

As Mary stood at the foot of the Cross on which Jesus hung, the sword of sorrow Simeon had foretold pierced her soul. The seven sorrows of Mary are:

  1. The prophecy of Simeon (Luke 2:25-35)
  2. The flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:13-15)
  3. Loss of the Child Jesus for three days (Luke 2:41-50)
  4. Mary meets Jesus on his way to Calvary (Luke 23:27-31; John 19:17)
  5. Crucifixion and Death of Jesus (John 19:25-30)
  6. The body of Jesus being taken from the Cross (Psalm 130; Luke 23:50-54; John 19:31-37)
  7. The burial of Jesus (Isaiah 53:8; Luke 23:50-56; John 19:38-42; Mark 15:40-47)